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Diabetes and Driving

A Summary Guideline For People With Diabetes

Your legal responsibilities:

Notifying DVLA about your medication

Notifying DVLA about other diabetes related problems

Notifying DVLA about hypoglycaemia


It is your responsibility to notify DVLA if:

• You have more than one severe episode of hypoglycaemia (needing help from another person), whilst awake, within a 12 month period

• For Group 2 drivers (LGV/PCV) one episode of severe hypoglycaemia must be reported immediately to the DVLA

• You develop impaired awareness of hypoglycaemia (reduced ability to recognise low blood glucose)

• You experience severe hypoglycaemia whilst driving


Notifying DVLA about other diabetes related problems

You should notify DVLA if:

• Laser treatment is planned in both eyes or in one eye if you have already lost sight in the other

• You are unable to read a car number plate (wearing glasses or contact lenses) at 20.5 metres (67 feet)

• You develop circulation problems or nerve damage (affecting the sensation, power or coordination) in your legs or feet which make it difficult to drive or require that you can only drive an adapted vehicle (e.g. automatic car or one with a hand operated accelerator or brake)

• Any other existing medical condition deteriorates which would prevent safe driving e.g. epilepsy 



Notifying DVLA about hypoglycaemia Hypoglycaemia means a blood glucose of less than

4 or symptoms that respond to glucose. This may be accompanied by feeling hungry, sweating, shaking, palpitations, feeling faint, dizziness, nausea, blurred vision, lip tingling or headache. Many accidents caused by hypoglycaemia occur because the driver continues to drive even though they are experiencing the warning signs of hypoglycaemia.


Notifying DVLA about your medication:

Diabetes treatment

Group 1 Car or motorbike

Group 2 LGV or PCV

Diet alone

No

No

Tablets (Metformin, pioglitazone, gliflozins or gliptins)

No

Yes

Non-insulin injections (GLP1)

No

Yes

Tablets with risk of hypoglycaemia (Sulphonylurea (e.g. gliclazide) or meglitinides (e.g. repaglinde))

No

Yes

Insulin

Yes

Yes

Temporary insulin (e.g. during pregnancy or after a heart attack)

No

Yes